How to Reduce Your Energy Costs

When the temperature starts climbing, you start running your air conditioner more, and your electricity bill goes up. When the winter hits, you run the heater more, and your electricity bill goes up. Depending on where you live, that could mean running your heater or air conditioner year-round, just trying to keep your house comfortable. That means you are spending a lot of money keeping the outside temperature at bay. There has to be a better way. Well, there is. However, you first have to understand what makes your house uncomfortable in the first place.

UPVC windows

UPVC windows

Thermal Bridges

A thermal bridge is any area or material that allows heat to transfer from one area to another. Obviously, an open window or open door is going to be the most effective thermal bridge. In the sense of keeping your house comfortable and your electrical bill low, an effective thermal bridge is a bad thing. So, open exposure to the outside is obviously the best thermal bridge, but what else counts?

Wood is not a very effective thermal bridge; it tends to absorb the temperature of the room or area that it’s in. You can tell this because a wooden pole on a cold day is not as cold as a metal one. Metal, however, can be quite an effective thermal bridge. You’ll see this type of bridging when it comes to window panes and roofs. Metal roofs need to be well-insulated or they’ll transfer a lot of heat. Also, the windows need to be insulated, so the metal doesn’t undermine your efforts to keep the place at a nice temperature. The windows are probably your biggest culprit for heat loss or heat entrance, but they are also the most treatable.

Windows

Windows

Windows

Windows are made of glass, which is not very effective insulation. If a window has two panes with a vacuum between them, it can actually be somewhat effective at blocking a temperature exchange, because the vacuum does not allow particles to heat up and pass through.

Sunlight is also a factor that you have to consider. Sunlight comes in through windows and heats up the air inside your house. That gets expensive quickly. The simplest solution to that problem is to install some curtains or blinds that block out the light. But what do you do about the windows themselves? The glass in the window heats up, and so does the window frame. If you’re somewhere sunny like Australia, that hot window can be significant enough to increase the temperature in your house. Your best bet would be to invest in UPVC windows in Melbourne. They have coated, synthetic window frames that reflect sunlight away from your house and do not absorb heat. That means they won’t heat up as much as metal or wood. Since they won’t heat up, they won’t transfer heat into your house. UPVC is a very ineffective thermal bridge; in this case, ineffectiveness is ideal.

Also, the more resilient and reflective PVC will survive the sunlight for longer, which means you won’t have to replace it as often.

Shubhi Gupta is a freelance author and writes for a variety of online publications. She actively writes blogs and articles and very fond of writing content on different trendy topicss related to Education, training,resources,health and technology.